Saturday, November 17, 2012

Enhancing Intimacy. . . . . . .part 3

The Very Thought Of Him - GAYTWOGETHER.COM - click to enlarge(click to enlarge)

Posted: 16 Nov 2012 06:20 AM PST
Gay Relationships: Enhancing Intimacy In Your Life[ continued from yesterday ]  This is the third installment in a 3-part article series about struggles with intimacy that are relatively common in gay relationships. In Part 1 of the series, “intimacy freak-out” was defined and the reasons why gay men are prone to this phenomenon were discussed.

This article will address some of the common intimacy fears that could block your potential for true connection with your partner and will offer some tips for enhancing your comfort with intimacy to help you achieve ultimate relationship bliss! 
 
The “Freak-Out” Checklist: In my training and work with gay men, I have found some common intimacy fears that can prevent us from experiencing the depths of fulfillment that love can offer. Take a look through this list of fears to determine if there may be anything getting in the way of your ability to be uninhibited and free with your lover.

Identifying your emotional blocks to intimacy is the first step toward freeing yourself from their grip. Add your own to the list: 

fear of abandonment fear of rejection and being neglected fear of engulfment or being suffocated/smothered fear of loss of control threatened by loss of personal freedom fear of being disappointed or “let down” by partner low self-esteem, fears of not being “good enough” fear of affection and sex fear of exposure, of being known for who you really are difficulties with trust difficulties expressing one’s emotions/feelings fear of failure other 
  Self-Analysis: As you can see, any one of the above intimacy fears can stifle you to the point that you’re not fully able to be “at one” with a partner because you’re holding yourself back. Fear may be too strong a word for some of the items---any hint of uneasiness or discomfort is indicative of an “issue” of some form.

While it’s important to have boundaries and protect yourself from emotional harm, these characteristics can act as a barrier to experiencing love to its fullest capacity if they become a patterned response.

In addition to these fears, it might be helpful to examine some of the contributing factors that led to the anxiety in the first place. Here are some questions to ponder to get you started in looking at how the difficulties with intimacy you may have could have developed. 

·How did your parents show affection and intimacy when you were growing up?
·Any childhood wounds, abuse, or loss from the past that make relationships difficult?
·Any unresolved family-of-origin issues that create baggage for you?
·Are you unable to grieve and “let go” of the break-up of a prior relationship?
·How about internalized homophobia? Low self-esteem?
·Any negative experiences with other males growing up that left an imprint on you?

Whether you’re partnered or single, knowledge of your intimacy blocks and contributing factors can help armor you in defeating them so you can have the most ultimate relationship possible.

Become An Intimacy Champ: So you want to be a pro at this intimacy stuff and really super-charge your relationship and knock your partner’s socks off? While it won’t happen overnight, with persistent practice of the following tips, you’ll begin to see a positive evolution take place in your relationship with more connection and emotional intimacy.

What You Can Do As An Individual:

Face your anxiety head-on. The more you run from it, the stronger hold it’ll have on you. Learn and practice relaxation techniques to calm and soothe you.

Gay Relationships: Enhancing Intimacy In Your Life
Identify your triggers. How are your “freak-out” symptoms manifested and under what conditions?

Combat your male gender socialization script by becoming more proficient in emotional intelligence and expression.
Develop positive self-esteem and confidence through taking risks to further your personal growth and work aggressively at defeating any internalized homophobia.

Identify any negative, limiting beliefs you may have about relationships, masculinity, and being gay and counter them with new, affirming messages. Read up on cognitive restructuring techniques for help with this.

Gain closure on unfinished business from the past. Your past doesn’t have to keep you stuck, no matter how traumatic it may have been. You have the power to shape a new destiny.

What You Can Do As A Couple:
Make your relationship the number one priority in your lives. Devote lots of quality time together and protect your partnership from competing outside sources.Gay Relationships: Enhancing Intimacy In Your Life

Build a relationship tool-box filled with skills in communication, conflict negotiation, boundaries, and problem-solving.
Cultivate a hot sex life together, filled with creativity and passion.
Develop a shared vision and goals for the future together as a couple.
Give each other frequent “positive strokes,” appreciate each other for who you are, share your feelings, take responsibility for your issues, and practice the art of forgiveness.

Conclusion:
Through a relationship with another man who is just as motivated as you to nurture a positive connection on all levels, you too can experience one of the most powerful and healing forces life has to offer. It’ll mean confronting some of your anxieties directly and being receptive to encountering a wide range of emotions and experiences. It’s worth it! After all, the road to gay self-acceptance and happiness has been hard enough to then rob yourself of one of life’s most precious gifts; you shouldn’t have to sacrifice what’s rightfully yours to claim and enjoy. You deserve love! Cheers to your intimacy quest!

*References: The term “intimacy freak-out” taken from Crowell,Al(1995). I’d Rather Be Married: Finding Your Future Spouse. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

© Dr. Brian Rzepczynski, The Gay Love Coach
The suggestions and feedback offered in this column are but one perspective of multiple approaches to dealing with problems or challenges. Information provided in articles and advice columns should not be used as a substitute for coaching or therapy when these services are needed. None of this information should be your only source when making important life decisions. This information should not be used for diagnosing or treating a particular problem, nor should it take the place of a consultation with a trained professional. It is your responsibility to consult a professional prior to making any life decisions.
Dr. Brian Rzepczynski, contributing author to GAYTWOGETHER, is one of the leading love coaches for the gay community. As a licensed dating and relationship coach, Dr. Brian Rzepczynski, DHS, MSW has over 18 years experience as a psychotherapist and life coach specializing in helping GLBT individuals and couples develop and maintain successful and fulfilling intimate relationships. He holds a doctorate degree in human sexuality from the Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality and a master’s degree in clinical social work from Western Michigan University. He also runs a successful private therapy practice, Personal Victory Counseling, Inc. http://thegaylovecoach.com

Thanks to Brian and to Michael@gaytwogether.com


6 comments:

Coop said...

I think most of us are afraid that we aren't "good enough" and/or that we'll be rejected. I disagree with Dr. Brian. Those misgivings (I won't label them fears) aren't "issues" unless they stop us.

I had decided I'd be a be a bad boyfriend bad partner. I'm re-evaluating my self assessment. :-) I'm still afraid i'll hurt someone. That's why I preferred being single.





JustinO'Shea said...

" I disagree with Dr. Brian. Those misgivings (I won't label them fears) aren't "issues" unless they stop us."

And. .????

Is something an 'issue' or a 'fear' only when it hits us like an 18 wheeler and melds us to the pavement?

Even my old three wheel tryke can slow us down. . . . .huuuaaaahhhhh!

Coop said...

Well, Justin... I don't mind flying and I prefer a short flight to a long day in a car. But that doesn't mean I don't think of what could go wrong. I just get on the plane anyway.
Does that mean i'm afraid to fly?

Have you ever worried about being rejected? :-)

JustinO'Shea said...

Yes, Coops, I have worried. . .and I have experienced rejection. yep. Does that bother me? Yes. Do I allow the possibility - in my own mind - to make me stay home, stay in, not go places I want to be at. . .no.
I do not want to become a "shut in in the corners of my mind". . .However, I am a bit more cautious around certain people or situations. I do not go looking to be hurt/rejected. .I am no fool. . I can say I allow my successes to influence decisions; not my failures. . .or some one else's mis-judgments and failures.

Coop said...

So therapy says that my misgivings about flying IS an issue. But I am ok because I know how to handle it? How to make sure it doesn't clip my wings, to coin a phrase?
I could've use "keep me grounded" but "grounded" is also a good thing. (-: Breaking down every feeling like this is hard work. I'd just say it's a non-issue.

Thus, fear of rejection is always an issue, but what matters is how we handle it?








Gary Kelly said...

One of the consolations of getting older is that I've forgotten why I used to fear rejection. In fact, I've forgotten why I ever wanted another person in my life in the first place. It's no longer of any consequence, and I'm quite a happy camper these days.

Which reminds me of a bloke who was asked if he had to choose between Alzheimer's and Parkinson's which would it be? He answered, "I'd rather spill my drink than forget where I keep the bottle."